Tag Archives: speculative fiction

Beyond What’s Beyond #writephoto

beyond

Photo by Sue Vincent

Jed took the shortcut through the trees.  He had to reach the little village beyond or there would be hell to pay.

“Just my luck,” he muttered as he stumbled over a root.

Even without the leaves it was just too dark to keep up his pace.  Cursing again he slowed down a bit.

A blinding white light shot through the trees throwing everything into a sharp relief.   It grew brighter, so everything was a stark black of shadows or white of light.

And then it all began to burn.

The last thought that ran through Jed’s mind was, “I’m too late.  Nuclear Armageddon.”

*

“What are you doing?” the professor asked. Continue reading

Advertisements

Threshold – #writephoto

threshold

Photo by Sue Vincent

Morning light seeped in, illuminating the threshold, but not digging its way any deeper.  With the dawn came the salt-tinged breeze.  The surf continued, as it always had and always would, a constant background murmur and throb.  It was relaxing, kept the job at hand out of mind.

I peeked out from the entrance of the cave.  Nothing was moving.  I slipped back into the shadow.  They’d be here.  I knew.

*

“Come in.”

I opened the door and took a step, but then froze at the threshold.

“I’m sure you know all of these people.  Please come closer.”

The Commander continued to smile, but I knew something was up, something unpleasant.  I took two steps into the room.  The door was closed behind me. Continue reading

Rift – #writephoto

rift

Photo by Sue Vincent

Jeg walked deeper into the woods.  His footsteps went almost at random for his mind was not on his path nor his surroundings.

It wasn’t just Dalph, though the rift that had sprung up between them bothered him. Just one misplaced word, one misinterpretation, and thousands of years of bad blood between his people, the Marishny, and hers, the Iniya, came bubbling to the surface.  They needed to work as one against their common enemy, and now a gaping chasm had opened up. The entire alliance was at risk.

Jeg walked on, head bowed.  He had long ago left familiar territory, but he didn’t notice.

Actually, it was Dalph.  The Iniya were so unapproachable.  They were breathtakingly beautiful, with a holy light always surrounding them.  There was something of the angelic with them for although they were as fallible as the Marishny, they could not knowingly do evil.  Jeg’s own people, though aspiring to good, seemed to fall into the pitfall of evil all too often.  The Iniya were slim and tall, a head taller than the average Marishny, and exceedingly strong. They could work minor magic.  No, not work magic, they were magic. The Marishny were closer to animals while the Iniya closer to the heavenly Atonee. Continue reading

Sign – #writephoto

Photo prompt provided by Sue Vincent

The house was pitch black when I entered.  I assumed the power must have been out, but the rest of the neighborhood was well lit.  Was there a problem that tripped off our entire house? Perhaps Aunt Lucy had done something. An image of her, frizzy grey hair standing on end, eyes bugged out, flashed through my mind.  She was an oddball and may have done something, well, not too bright…

“Aunt Lucy?” I said, though it was little more than a whisper.

I walked carefully through the house, not turning on any switches.  If my great aunt was touching a wire, I didn’t want to be the one to throw even more juice through what I imagined must be her smoldering remains.

“Aunt Lucy?” Continue reading

The Painting

“Where did you say we were going?” Ellie asked.

Justin shot her a quick glance and mischievous grin before putting his eyes back on the road.

“I didn’t.” he said.

He drove on, still grinning, He could see Ellie out of the corner of his eye and could tell she was grinning too.

“We’ve just been on the road so long, I’m getting a bit tight.”

She stretched in a way that Justin felt was to accentuate her curves more than to relieve any muscular tension. In fact, in ways it increased his tension.

He risked taking his attention off of the narrow back road to take in that nice form of hers.

Elisabeth was quite a bit older, but he wasn’t sure how old.  His guess was in her mid-40s, but it might have been up or down by as much as a decade.  He had heard that women that age liked guys in their mid-20s, particularly guys like him who spent a lot of time at the gym: fit muscular men in their physical prime.  Actually, she could be mid-60s for all he cared, because she was pretty hot.  He had been itching to undress her from the moment he first saw her. Continue reading

Tranquil – #writephoto

tranquil

Photo by Sue Vincent

The river slowed around the large bend, almost as still as a pond.  A fragrant breeze blew through the trees, giving much needed relief from the heat. I could hear a lazy fly buzz past.

I turned towards Kim.  “It’s so peaceful,” I said.

She nodded, looking out at the reflections of the trees on the water, not at me.

“It’s nice to be able to find a nice, tranquil corner of the world for a few minutes,” I said.

She just nodded again, still not looking at me.

It was understandable that she would be lost in thought, but on the other hand, I would think she would want some reminder of the loved ones around her. I sure needed the comfort of another living person. Continue reading

Release Me

fantasy-3533325_960_720

pixabay image by Natan Vance

With a slam of the door, Dave entered the tiny apartment and slumped down into a chair. Although the sun was still up, the room was dark.  The ratty curtains were pulled tight and a threadbare blanket, adding it’s slim weight, was thrown over the only window.  Dave wanted to block out the world, afraid of what he might see, afraid of what he might remember.

Hiding the world only went so far. He knew it would catch up to him anyway.

After a few minutes of sitting, the walls, as expected, breathed in and expanded out, as if the world was turning inside out, just like during “The Incident”.  As he sat there, it felt as if a part of him was being turned inside out as well, ripped from his skull and flushed down a cosmic toilet, just as it had been on that day. The part that was flushed away that day never returned, and yet there was something that took its place, someone else.

No! Nobody else. No. Continue reading

Invitation #writephoto

Photo by Sue Vincent

(Note: This is the second chapter of yet another serial…  The first chapter is here (Note2 – if you read the first version on my last story, Timeless, you may want to read the second take as there were a few changes))

Michael glanced over at the man next to him. The man had finally came up with “Alexander, but my friends call me Alex”, but nobody believed it, and nobody could imagine calling him “Alex”.

Michael still wasn’t sure why he had invited this stranger to stay with him.  The guy was just plain strange.  But he obviously had no place else to go.  And the police were still searching for some sign of who he was.

The police said that there were no records on Alexander Karios any place in any country.  Fingerprints came back as nothing. No military, criminal or missing person records seemed to fit.

The landscape became more wooded as they drove. Alexander spoke for the first time since they got in the car. “We’re leaving the moors?” Continue reading

Timeless – #writephoto

timeless

Time began from nothing.  There was void, nothing, and then grey as the Universe spun up.

Damn, I thought to myself, I must have slipped again.

It often took a few days to get my bearings again after a slip, but I’d start trying as soon as I totally regained consciousness and could see my surroundings.  I could be in luck and there could be something there telling me exactly when and where I was.

As the world slowly came into focus, I tried to remember where I had just been.

Ah, yes, China about 3,000 years before what came to be known as the Common Era.

No.  That was the last time. Continue reading

When the Elephant Bumps the Mouse House – Chapter 7

elephant-2910293_960_720

Pixabay image by Marianne Sopala

(Note – This is Chapter 7 (and final) of the story.  See chapter 1.)

The world rolled by just outside of the car’s window.  The sun had recently set and the western sky still glowed yellow, but the black of night was creeping in.  It wouldn’t take over, of course, since the suburban lights illuminated the entire sky.  There was still no simulation playing in the car and it was moving at a constant 100 kph.

Jesk didn’t notice. He just sat, staring forward with vacant eyes.

Strangely enough, he was not thinking about Thara nor about Adi.  His mind was on the young Jesk, the young Brey and their parents. He even was thinking about their dog, Rex. He rarely thought of them at all, and when he did it was just in passing, but for some reason Brey’s funeral had brought back the memories long forgotten.  The good times and bad. All of those shared moments.  All of the things they did, saw and talked about.

He thought of Brey teasing him mercilessly, but with love in her eyes.  He thought of Mom making peanut butter sandwiches.  When had he last eaten peanut butter? The day before the accident?  He thought of day to day activities, of TV and family trips, sitting around the table at dinner talking about school.  He remembered Brey having a date when she was a freshman in high school and how he had teased her, getting her back for all of those times she embarrassed him in front of his friends.  Rex was there for years, his constant companion. And, of course there was Dad.

Jesk frowned. Continue reading