The Return of Hope

vintage-kitchen-tools-valerie-barrett

PHOTO PROMPT © Valerie J. Barrett

Momma made sure Poppa looked good, even ironing his faded work shirt.  He drank his “tea”, really some dandelion greens soaked in hot water, as she fussed about him.

“Now yous show ‘em what you ‘ave.”

It had been a hard year.  The heat and drought of last summer made for a lean winter, then the cold, wet spring has made it impossible to plant on time.  We all counted on this interview.

Long before I’d been born, Poppa worked in the Power Plant.  Now, after more than a dozen dark years, theys a gonna be turning it on again.

**

(Not sure if the post apocalyptic vibe came through…)

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Valerie J. Barrett.  Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

50 thoughts on “The Return of Hope

  1. granonine

    You could be describing this past winter and spring here in PA, only pre-apocalyptic :) So wet, the farmers are just now doing what they’ve been waiting to do for several weeks. Good story, love the voice.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      If I wanted to damage America, I’d start with the power grid – people don’t seem to know what to do once the power goes out. Of course, the cell phone grid would be right behind it ;)

      Thanks.

      Like

      Reply
      1. DB McNicol

        I’ve said exactly that for years. Back in 2005 when I was touring the US on my motorcycle, I was on a ride with friends out in California. Two of the guys needed gas and we stopped at a station – no power. Um, no gas. Also back in 1988, I was flying back to Chicago for the second week of IT training after coming home to NY for mother’s day. Big fire knocked out a huge section of telecommunications. Our flight was rerouted to Cincinnati for a couple hours before being allowed to land about 5 hours late. No phone service (no mobile phones then either), no ATMs working, no 9-1-1 services, it was a disaster for over a week. https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1989-03-11-8903250918-story.html

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. trentpmcd Post author

          Back in the early 90s a rare hurricane hit New Hampshire and took the power out for a cou8ple of days – not long compared to some blizzards, but… One of my friends had a few roommates who had no idea what to do. They pretty much sat in front the TV all day and cried. It made it hard for him to read ;) After that he said that if the grid where shutdown for more than a couple of days, America would rip itself apart, and I believe him… Reading the article you pointed out, I worked at an Air Traffic Control facility and, again early 90s, one cut line pretty much shutdown communications with all planes in New England. It was quickly restored and since then they built in a lot of redundancies into the system, but it’s still scary.

          Liked by 1 person

          Reply
          1. Donna McNicol [dbmcnicol]

            Just read your ABOUT page…I retired from a career in IT (although networking is still a dirty word to me), mostly in software consulting in specialized languages. I grew up in Mass until 9th grade (Duxbury) when we moved to NH (Exeter area). Small world…

            Liked by 1 person

            Reply
            1. trentpmcd Post author

              These days I’m a program manager for web hosting. In a few years I will be moving the other way, from NH to MA – we are in the process of selling our cottage and bought a house In Dennis (on the Cape) which will eventually be our retirement home. yes, a small world :)

              Liked by 1 person

              Reply
  2. Abhijit Ray

    Poppa is getting ready to work again on a power plant. In this era of climate change, when summers are long and hot, winter is short and spring is wet, what fuel will be used? Will it be environment friendly?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      As I answered to Iain, starting the power plant back up might be a double edged sword – perhaps the power plant running was one of the reasons for the power plant to be shut down – in a way it caused it’s own demise by the environmental damage it caused….

      Like

      Reply
  3. Dale

    It’s ironic to read this today when just earlier I was listening to the news and how in our prairie provinces the lack of rain means many farmers are selling off their cows as they cannot feed them.
    Sorry I could not help but think of that as much as apocalyptic – mind you… kinda is, too, eh?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      “Apocalyptic” doesn’t have to be 4-horsemen, Revelations all of the time. It is a kind of local apocalypse, the collapse of a way of life. Very sad about the farmers, though. I know similar things have happened in the past, but it doesn’t help the people who can’t pay the bills today.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Dale

        No, I realise that. It is a word that gets overused for the huge things that it feels out of place in this case. And for this family, it is definitely apocalyptic… Do forgive my ignorance in this case!

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. trentpmcd Post author

          A problem with 100 word stories… One of the reasons I put the little disclaimer down on this story, because I knew it was possible people wouldn’t catch the clue about the power plant being off line for over a dozen years.

          Like

          Reply
  4. Na'ama Yehuda

    Alas, apocalypse has come and gone in too many places over the centuries, wearing different technologies and reasons …but always the ones who ended up suffering the most were those reduced to dandelion tea, and they were almost always the ones with the most dignity.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  5. michael1148humphris

    Thank heaven for the tough old dandelion plant. As I read this I saw the 1930s and the dust bowl as I read this, perhaps a different apocalypse,

    Like

    Reply

Express Yourself

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s