Heading for Warmer Waters

fridays-moon-ted-strutz

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

The tourist season’s almost over

A-yep.

I’m planning on harboring The Bangor for the winter after the holiday weekend.

You usually do.

A-yep.

Something on your mind?

She’s as slow as molasses on a winter’s morning and has never done a long trip.

She’s an island girl, not an ocean liner.

A-yep.  But I was still thinking of taking her south for the winter.

A Caribbean cruise on a Maine ferryboat?

I heard they could use some help down there.

How long would it take to get passengers from San Juan to Miami?

Not sure, but fixing to find out.

— —

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo provided by © Ted Strutz.  Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

For non-Americans – this coming weekend is Columbus Day weekend, often the last big tourist weekend of the year, at least in New England.

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68 thoughts on “Heading for Warmer Waters

    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks Y. I almost changed that line – what do people in Maine know about molasses? If I had more words to use, I would have changed it to “slow as maple syrup on a cold February morning.”

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      1. prior..

        but you are thinking like a good writer to consider what a geographical area might really – use and while they might have maple syrup up there – for some reason i cannot conjure up the image of it being slow – even if cold. I know it can get viscous and thick – but molasses is all sticky and had the instant impact.

        also, the s use (n the sentence you kept) made for a fun read….

        “She’s as slow as molasses on a winter’s morning and has….”

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            1. trentpmcd Post author

              Right. I’m not sure if there is a special term for that, but I do like repeating sounds on occasion, and it is often more interesting if they aren’t all the first sound of the word.

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  1. Jelli

    Excellent. I was just talking to Hubs the other night, and the thought occurred to me that they have all these ‘supply boats’ off shore full of supplies they can’t get into port, and we were discussing and wondering where the ferryboats and personal yachts/sailboats/row boats/dingies or anything that floats were. Even a dingy full of supplies would be better than no supplies. Sigh… I just hate seeing people suffering so, and all throughout the carribbean, not just PR.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      There are a lot of issues, like how to get to shore, and fuel. A ferry made to go between islands that are only a dozen miles apart might not be able to carry enough fuel for an extended voyage. and then there is getting to shore. But it does seem like something can be done. A rowboat-full at a time to unload is, as you said, better than nothing. And yes, Marie was insult to injury – entire islands were made almost unlivable by the two big storms.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      what I’d be most worried about is fuel – I doubt a ferry like this could go to far from shore without worrying, and if all of the facilities have been destroyed, he might not have luck refilling if he actually made it there…

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      A very good way to spend the off season, good for all involved. Unfortunately, I think you are right that many in the Caribbean will need help for at least a few years.

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            1. trentpmcd Post author

              The Ocean was his first love, but the Ocean is a harsh mistress and can be tied to no man (or woman), so he is tighter with his ship than with any human imaginable ;)

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Exactly, bring everything that floats over there. In the present case it might be more of bringing supplies in than taking people off, but the same in principle.

      Thanks

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Yeah (my typical term for it), I understand – once you spend some time “Down East”, it’s hard not use those terms ;) Current events being what they are, I figured this would be a good topic.

      Liked by 2 people

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks Willow :) It’s impossible to get the “Down East” Maine accent right, but, a-yep, I can try ;) Don’t know how many have gone south to help, but I expect at least a few…

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