Immature Loon

Immature Loon

The other day I went down to one of my favorite little walks, Bells Neck in Harwich.  I got out of the car and walked towards the herring ladder.  There is a pool of water above the flume, a little smooth inlet away from the main pond.  I saw a bird between the parking lot and the water, a largish bird.  Not eagle big, or Great Blue Heron big, but something with the body the size of a Canadian Goose but a much shorter neck.

I walked pretty close, and it only half watched me.  But then I got Fiyero out of the car and it lifted it’s head and kept a sharp, red eye on the dog.

I wasn’t sure what it was, but it looked familiar.  I thought “Loon”, but it was the wrong color.  Besides, I had never seen a Loon on the Cape.  In Canada and northern Maine, sure, but Cape Cod?  Nope.

Immature Loon

When I returned from the walk, the bird was still there.  I took a few photos and went back to the cottage.  I followed my hunch and Googled ‘Loon’.  Sure enough, it looked like a Loon.  There are a few species that have similar coloring, but I decided it was an immature Common Loon.

Next I did a search for “What do I do if I found an injured bird on Cape Cod”.  Yes, you can type questions into Google.  One place stood out, Wild Care of Cape Cod.  It was Saturday, but I had to try.  No answer.  I waited a few minutes and tried again.  A person!

I talked to the woman at Wild Care and described the bird and location and such.  She wanted me to go back and see how close I could get.  I stood right over that poor little Loon and it didn’t try to get away or strike at me.  She said she was going to call around and find a volunteer,

About 10 or 15 minutes later, I got received a call.  The volunteer wasn’t exactly sure where I was, but knew the bike trail parking a quarter of a mile away.  So I drove over to the bike path and waited about 45 minutes or so for her to arrive.  Not a big deal – she had to prepare and I have no idea how far she had to drive – parts of Cape Cod are almost an hour drive away.  P-Town might be farther.  I was just happy someone was coming.

Immature Loon

Anyway, long story short(er), we went back and the woman who had volunteered put a towel over the bird and picked it up.  The poor thing seemed pretty weak and only feebly tried to fight back.  She put the bird in a container and secured the top.  The volunteer was very efficient.  It was obvious she had done this before.

I don’t know what has become of “my” poor little immature Loon, but I know I left it in very good hands.  I can only hope for the best.

So that was my excitement for that trip to Cape Cod.

Note – I love loons.  I once posted about a special encounter with a loon and the calls that reverberated across a small lake for almost a minute.

Photo below is two mature Loons in Canada:

Loons

 

Advertisements

25 thoughts on “Immature Loon

  1. M. L. Kappa

    Pet rescue! That’s what we call it in our family, and we’ve done a few of those – sea turtle stuck in nets, a couple of owls, a hawk with a broken wing… I haven’t been on my reader in a while, Trent, I enjoyed this post. Will browse more…🌹

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Pingback: If We Were Having Coffee on the 24th of June | Trent's World (the Blog)

  3. Sonya Lira

    I think it is always a good idea to call them I hate to see any animal in pain. The last time we took a bird in ourselves because there was no one around that could help. It was for a Grackle and they sent me an email telling me the bird did not make it. I looked at this way at least we tried.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      The woman I was talking to asked if I could do the rescue if they couldn’t find a volunteer. Uhm… if i had to, but I’d rather have someone who knows what they are doing pick it up! I’m glad someone else came.

      I agree that it is a good idea to at least try. I also hate to see them in distress.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Joanne Sisco

    This is such an awesome story!! I’m sure when it was all done, you had devoted a few hours to saving this little guy. Not many people would think to do that. Kudos.
    Coincidentally, I just learned yesterday that the loon is the official provincial bird of Ontario. My province thanks you :)

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Most of my memories of loons come from a small lake in Ontario. So I thank Ontario :)

      Unfortunately not enough people take the time to help distressed wildlife. And truthfully, i had no idea what to do until I Googled it, I’m not sure what I would have done pre-Internet.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Joanne Sisco

        We had an extremely unfortunate incident here a few weeks ago. A bear had wandered into a heavy populated residential area not far from us. There were no animal rescue or Natural Resource people available to deal with the situation, nor were there any local vets with the necessary tranquilizer equipment available. There was no option but for the police to kill the animal.
        Sadly I think we are going to see more and more of these incidences as urban sprawl displaces wildlife from their habitats. There just aren’t enough resources dedicated to everything that’s important.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. trentpmcd Post author

          This has been a bad year for bears – I just read about another person killed by a black bear in Alaska, the second one in the last week. Black bears very rarely kill people, usually it’s brown bears and grizzlies, but as we take away more and more of their environment, negative consequences will occur, and most of the time it is the animals that suffer.

          Like

          Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      That sound that the video begins with? Out on a lake in the middle of nowhere, it is as haunting as you can get. They typically only are found in very pristine places, so the site and sound of the birds are often associated with unspoiled nature. I had to look up the name, but it doesn’t have anything to do with lunatic or Luna – moon. It is for “lame” since these birds have a hard time walking on land and look like they are lame. That being said, Daffy Duck looks a lot like a loon, which I think is appropriate, since he is shown on Looney Tunes cartoons….

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. sherloque

        you really got me interested in this (strange to me) bird. Apparently in French Canadian language it’s called a “plongeon” or a “huard” or both. From what I read there’s a picture of that bird on a $20 note in Canada. In Europe it’s a protected species as they seem to disappear from the scene. For my part I had never heard or seen one. I do hope your protégé is faring well. How about calling it (him? her?) Trent ??? Please keep posting some news!

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. trentpmcd Post author

          I will call about him/her. (When the person was rescuing it, I kept saying “he” and she kept saying “she”). As someone pointed out, it is the province bird for the province of Ontario. They are great birds, and the stay far to the north, so they are more common up in Canada than down here. There are several loon species, but most of them that I have seen are the common loon.

          Like

          Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      It is such a haunting sound. The other loon post I did was about sitting in a kayak at night as a loon “serenaded” me. It was close enough I could have touched it with my paddle. Very cool. I hope the little guy I helped rescue is OK…

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. dawnkinster

    I hesitated to push the “like” button…because I feel so bad for the poor little loon. But I like that you got it help, as surely it would have died soon had you not. Pretty little thing. I hope it survives. I think you can call and find out how it is doing. My brother saved a hawk once, and took it to a wild bird habitat, and was able to keep tabs on it for awhile. You should be able to find out if it survived the night at least.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      It is awful to think about an animal in distress. This guy was obviously having issues. I most likely will call sometime and ask about it. It’s great that there are places that are set up to help.

      Like

      Reply

Express Yourself

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s