And Winter Descended

ice-on-the-window

Copyright – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

My mind wondered to the snow-kissed windows of the cottage where I watched my grandfather’s last breath.  It had been my first taste of death, now a seeming fairy tale in this nightmare land of carnage.  A bird singing on the bright July morning brought me back.

The ground shook as if from an earthquake, the bird stopped singing.  Whistles sounded.  I climbed out of the trench and slowly walked toward the German line, as instructed.

I saw the flashes of the machine guns before I heard their report.

Winter descended, July forgotten.  I once again saw through snow-kissed windows.

Word count = 100

May there be no more days like July 1, 1916 – 100 years ago today.

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This weeks prompt is here and uses a photo provided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  Read more or join in by following the “linky“.

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29 thoughts on “And Winter Descended

  1. patriciaruthsusan

    Sad story about a terrible war. It was forced suicide to make those men walk into the face of machine guns. One of the reasons my dad joined the U.S. Navy he said was to “stay out of the mud”. Those men were “cannon fodder”. After WWI there seems to have been better planning. Anything would have been better. Well written. :) — Suzanne

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks. Reading the accounts of that battle and the war in general is just harrowing. Were the leaders that naive or just that cruel to make the decisions they did? Very sad to think of the unnecessary loss of life, thinking of those poor people walking into the face of certain death.

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      1. patriciaruthsusan

        I read that many of the land-owning families lost their sons, sometimes their only sons. It changed the U.K. forever. What it amounted to was a slaughter on both sides. I think it was that old battlefield thinking that outlived its time. It didn’t work with guns and cannons. The same thing happened in the U.S. Civil War. Men were simply mowed down. It made no sense but the generals were too pigheaded to give it up.The U.S. colonists learned a better way of fighting from the tribals who fought from cover. It simply made good sense which it seemed the military leaders of the time were lacking.—- Suzanne

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks. We really haven’t been talking about this over here (US), I guess since we really participated in that battle, but I read BBC and have read so many articles that I had to write about it.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks! I’m a huge optimist, but I don’t think the wars will end any time soon either. Hoepfully we’ll not see carnage like this one, with tens of thousands dead or wounded in a day and perhaps a million casualties in one epic 5 month long battle.

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