Dabbler, Hobbyist, Amateur or Pro (Again)

Dabble - Sketch by Trent P McDonald

(Note – This was originally posted on January 15, 2014 and has been reposted twice before.  Yes, it is an old standby, but I like it ;)  I’m sorry if you’ve read it too many times.  If you haven’t read it before, I hope you enjoy!)

I’ve participated in many of the arts and have had formal instruction in a few.  I’ll admit that I’ve discovered a problem with trying to be a Jack of All Artistic Trades: it’s very easy to fall into the trap of Being a Master at None.

I can usually only concentrate on one thing at a time.  I’m speaking a long term “at a time” here.  If I’m practicing my trumpet and improving I can’t practice the piano; if I’m practicing the piano I’m not composing music; if I’m composing I’m not painting; if I’m painting I’m not writing; and if I’m writing I’m not practicing the trumpet.  Of course if I’m concentrating in one area nothing keeps me from dabbling in another.  For instance, although I’m in a writing phase now I still play the piano every day and draw silly sketches for my blog, like the one at the top of this page.

I think every artist should dabble in at least one art that’s not their primary means of expression.  I understand to be a professional means you have to concentrate all of your efforts into your media of choice, but that doesn’t mean you can’t unwind by playing around with something else.  A writer can strum a guitar.  A visual artist might write about her art.  A musician can sketch and draw.  It’s very healthy to have another outlet.

A hobbyist is someone who’s very into their art as a pastime. He’ll go deeper into it than just participating on occasion.  A hobbyist might read the trade magazines, lust after equipment and follow forums.  She may rearrange her life around her hobby but it’ll never become the one focus of her life.  A professional in one art can be a hobbyist in another, but it is a commitment of time and effort.

Today most people think of the term “amateur” as a put down.  “He made an amateur mistake.”  There is an older use of the word, a lover of an activity, that implied the practitioner was at a professional level but happened to do something else to put food on the table.  I like this definition.  It makes the art much more than a pastime.  It’s a passion.   Of course most artists are monogamous and their art demands to be their one true love.  There are artists that can cross over easily into other areas.

A professional might walk onto the stage to discover the President of the US, the Queen of England and the reincarnation of Franz Liszt are in the audience.  Even if the incompetent lighting crew continue to drop things on the stage the entire concert the professional plays every note perfectly and with great feeling.  Maybe a slight exaggeration, but this is the key difference between a pro and a good amateur – the amateur can shine in perfect conditions but the pro can shine in all conditions, including the worse.

I’ll admit that I typically dabble in my “off” arts, the ones I’m not currently concentrating on.  I’ve had enough experience in a few of them that I can shine things back to a pretty good level, but I can typically only keep one ball in the air at a time.  For the past few years I’ve been concentrating on writing so I dabble in the others, sometimes raising to the level of hobby.  I would never completely drop any of them – they keep me sane.

How about you?  Do you dabble in anything?  Do you try to take things to a higher level?  Can you concentrate on more than one thing at a time?  Do you need your art?

Here is to all of the dabblers out there.  The dabblers and the hobbyists.  May we long practice our secondary arts…

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7 thoughts on “Dabbler, Hobbyist, Amateur or Pro (Again)

  1. Pingback: If We Were Having Coffee for The Second Straight Day | Trent's World (the Blog)

    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Thanks. I do think creativity needs find a way out and it’s wrong to restrict it to just one outlet. Exploring more than one art is always helpful if for no other reason than it gives you a different perspective. I may look at a story from the standpoint of a musical composition, seeing motives, phrases and themes. Then I look again at it as a painting and finally read it out loud and see how it sounds to the ear, like playing an instrument.

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        1. trentpmcd Post author

          I have heard your singing (of course), seen you dancing, and seen some acting (I started following you because I so much loved the 12 days of Christmas videos you did a couple of years ago) but I don’t know if I’ve seen any of your drawings. Have you posted any?

          Liked by 1 person

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            1. trentpmcd Post author

              OK, I had to look. I remembered the videos but had forgotten the drawings. Sorry, what can I say, it was almost two years ago and I guess I don’t remember every drawing on every blog ;) The doodle drawings are cute. You should think about putting up a post of some of your fine art work.

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